Mona Abaza

Soziologie, Kairo
Aufenthalt: 01.02.-31.08.2015

Vita

Obtained her PhD in 1990 in sociology from the University of Bielefeld, Germany. Professor of sociology at the American University in Cairo. From 2009-2011 Mona Abaza was a visiting Professor of Islamology, department of Theology, Lund University. Visiting scholar in Singapore at the Institute for South East Asian Studies (ISEAS 1990-1992), Kuala Lumpur 1995-96, Paris (EHESS) 1994, Berlin (Fellow at the Wissenschaftskolleg 1996-97), Leiden (IIAS, 2002-2003), Wassenaar (NIAS, 2006-2007) and Bellagio (Rockefeller Foundation 2005).

 

Forschungsschwerpunkte

Cairo's urban reshaping after January's 2011 revolution, Public space and public art, The chronology of graffiti of the Mohammed Mahmud street, Art market and commodification of art

 

Publikationen (Auswahl)

Bücher

  • The Cotton Plantation remembered, American University in Cairo Press, 2013, 300 pages
  • Twentieth Century Egyptian Art: The Private Collection of Sherwet Shafei, The American University Press, 2011.
  • The Changing Consumer Culture of Modern Egypt, Cairo’s Urban Reshaping, Brill, Leiden / Cairo, American University Press, 2006.
  • Debates on Islam and Knowledge in Malaysia and Egypt, Shifting Worlds, Routledge Curzon Press, UK. 2002.
  • Islamic Education, Perceptions and Exchanges: Indonesian Students in Cairo, Cahier d'Archipel, EHESS, Paris. 1994.
  • The Changing Image of Women in Rural Egypt, Cairo Papers in Social Science, The American University in Cairo, 1987.

 

Artikel

  • Cairo Dairy: Space-Wars, Public Visibility and The Transformation of Public Space in Post-Revolutionary Egypt In Public Space. In: Public Space, Media Space, edited Chris Berry, Janet Harbord, Rachel Moore, Palgrave MacMillan, 2013, p-88-109.
  • Cyberspace and the Changing Face of Protest and Public Culture in Egypt. In: Democratic Transition in the Middle East, Unmaking Power Edited by Larbi Sadiki, Heiko Wimmen, Layla Al Zubaidi, Routledge 2013, pp. 87-107.
  • Segregating Downtown Cairo and the Mohammed Mahmud Street Graffiti. In: Theory, Culture and Society, October 2012.